24 Parents Who Are Doing it Right

These moms and dads have got this whole parenting thing figured out…

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63 Responses to 24 Parents Who Are Doing it Right

  1. Fer says:

    The one with the girl holding a sign about sneaking guys at 3am, wouldn’t it be dangerous? I mean is like an invitating pedophiles

  2. GreyDongle says:

    the 7th one is just wrong… that is overdoing it in my book

    • Stephen says:

      It seems like it’s part shaming, part advertisement.

    • cc says:

      lol the 7th one is awesome. in my book thats what you get for sneaking boys into your house at 3am. she is not a grown women and thats really disrespectful it also makes her look bad. maybe she needs to be shamed before she does it again and something bad happens to her. kudos to them.

      • baggins says:

        It’s actually very cruel and wrong from parents shaming their daughter from being a teenager. Those parent’s should educate their kid about safe sex and let her have boys or kids visit for nights…
        I haven’t seen worse parenting techniques than shaming because it leaves scars for a long time, sometimes for lifetime.

  3. Tracy says:

    the fourth last one is Tom Hardy with a fan dressed a Bane. because Tom played the villain Bane in The Dark Knight Rises. Not father & son.

  4. MilkyChocoxD says:

    I agree the one with the sign is horrible. Way to totally humiliate her, a kid’s punishment should be between the child and the parent and not humiliating them in front of the rest of the world.

    • Anonymous says:

      I doubt this was a first time offense for the girl. If the parents are willing to take it to the extreme to prove a point, they have more than likely exhausted their resources and are resorting to public humiliation to keep it from happening again. What would you do to keep your teenage daughter from getting pregnant and ruining her life?

      • Anonymous says:

        Birth control

      • Hannah says:

        Educate her about safe sex and make sure she felt safe talking to me, so that she didn’t feel like she had to sneak boys into her room 3:00am?

      • Anonymous says:

        So, getting pregnant as a teenager may create unnecessary obstacles that she did not need to have, but doesn’t have to ruin her life.
        Also, both signs are really gross.

    • Anonymous says:

      Maybe if she is embarrassed she wont want to do it again…How is that too extreme? When i was growing up we got a willow branch to the ass. People are too soft nowadays.

      • Anonymous says:

        Well not all parents were as stupid as yours, unfortunately. Others were able to figure out how to discipline their child without physically assaulting them.

        • Anonymous says:

          TO THE ASS. Nowhere else was mentioned. As far as I know, as long as it’s on the ass and nowhere else, it’s considered punishment – not “physically assaulting” them. I got a belt to the ass when I was a kid and I turned out just fine.

          • jess m says:

            Interesting. Can you show me where in the law books “strikes to the ass” are exempt from being painful/abusive/assault? I didn ‘t know it had to be specific body parts.

            I also love people who say “I was beaten as a kid and I turned out fine” No you didn’t. You grew up to be someone who thinks it’s ok to hit and injure children.

        • Anonymous says:

          There’s a difference between corporal punishment and physical assault. Sometimes all kids will respond to is a good whack on the behind. I’m 20 and my dad still threatens to go get the belt and while he never actually does, the threat is enough to get me to straighten my act out.

        • rain says:

          …and then there are people like you who insult the parents of someone you don’t even know. Maybe you should have had a switch taken to you so you could have grown up learning to be more respectful…

    • Serin says:

      Parents who use peer pressure to shame their kids into obeying them should not expect their kids to resist peer pressure when it’s used for other purposes.

      • Melissa says:

        Exactly. What message parents trying to send their children when they publicly shame them? Yeah, she might not do it again, but has she learned why it was wrong in the first place?

        On another note, I think its interesting how fathers get praised for doing what mothers are ~expected to do.

    • Skaii says:

      Pffff, It’ll teach her not to sneak boys into her room. Who knows how old she is but, she’s certainly not grown. I would have done the same thing to my kid. Who knows how much trouble she could have gotten in if she continued to do that. She could have brung the wrong boy home and gotten raped or worse, run away from home because a boy told her to. Abuse is one thing but, teaching your kid lesson is another, it may be harsh but, it was the right thing to do. If they had just grounded her or had a simple talk with her you think she would have stopped? No way in hell, Humiliation is a good way to teach a lesson and knock someone who think’s they’re grown down a couple of notches.

  5. Lynn says:

    Eh I don’t get what’s so great about picture #1. It’s just a dad eating with his kid. Is it supposed to be amazing because he’s willing to be around the pink stuff he was (at the very least) complicit in buying for her?! Are dads expected to avoid their daughters unless they’re someplace manly like the weight gym or never play with their daughters unless the daughters want to play with power tools? Ridiculous.

    • Dr. D says:

      You’d be surprised. A lot of fathers couldn’t be bothered to have a tea party or share a meal with their daughter at a little pink table, especially the stereotypical weightlifter guy.

      I think it’s sweet.

    • Anonymous says:

      Seconding this. It’s a sweet picture, yes, but I don’t think it’s necessarily an example of “great parenting.” It’s just a man tolerating his offspring. If our culture lauds that as some sort of wonderful parental accomplishment, we need to reevaluate our standards for fatherhood.

      • Anonymous says:

        shut up your obviously a prick

      • Anonymous says:

        Dude, it’s not about great parenting, it’s about parent’s doing it right. Is he doing it right? Then I don’t understand the problem.

        Sheesh, even my mom wouldn’t have a tea party with me at a tiny pink table — she’s too much of a tomboy.

        • Canaduck says:

          Do you think a picture of your mom (“tomboy” or not) would have made it on here as an example of “doing it right”? A lot of these are photos of parents going above and beyond for their children–I don’t see why having a tea party with them qualifies as particularly exemplary.

          It is a very cute picture, though.

    • Caio McCaioson Ibn Caio says:

      It’s blurry so I could be wrong, but I think his tattoo is 尊家, which is fancy old-timey Chinese for “respect family”.

      If that’s what it is it’s one of the rare good Chinese tattoos.

    • WhiteCourtain says:

      Well my dad never did. It would have been nice if he pulled his head out of his ass and been like these fathers above. We might have had a better realitionship that would have lasted even after I turned 18 lol since he stopped caring after that…So yeah. It’s kinda special in my opinion.

  6. SavhCaro says:

    I was enjoying these examples of INVOLVED parents……….right up until I read these comments.

    • jess m says:

      for real. Sure, some of them aren’t a huge deal, but that just shows you how many of us take our parents for granted. To some neglected, abused, overlooked kids, simply dancing in the living room with their dad would be the greatest moment of their week. Sometimes THAT’S ALL IT TAKES.

      No one said these people deserve some sort of award or are better than you or are the best ever, just that they deserve a high five for doing it right. Some people are never happy unless they march in to point out the negative.

  7. Sinister Twist says:

    Am I really the only one who noticed that #9 is Aly Hannigan and Alexis Denisoff and their adorable offspring? And 12 is Patton Oswald and his daughter?

    • Silvia says:

      I noticed the Hannigan-Denisofs too, they always do adorable family costumes for Halloween. Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka do too, they should be here as well.

    • Anonymous says:

      The costume Patton Oswald is wearing was made by Adam Savage. 8D

  8. Anonymous says:

    This guy is also doing it so right:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ToTVFEHZhX4

    This kid will turn out just fine!

  9. jess m says:

    That’s Tom Hardy and a fan, not his son. Not saying Tom Hardy isn’t a good father, just that…he’s not a father to this kid …

    AS FAR AS WE KNOW ;)

  10. tonya says:

    wow! There are some people leaving comments about being”just fine” after spankings as children. I often find that these people are not “just fine”. Humiliation does not breed confidence. A confident human being often feels good about themselves and their actions. Not to be confused with arrogance: ) I feel that both of the young ladies holding up signs were mistreated. Most likely it is their parents desire to humiliate the children to begin with that led to the vulnerability of seeking approval from others.

    As far as good parenting. To spend any time having a meal with your child in this day and age is not as common as most might think.Especially breakfast. Granted cereal is an awful choice for the first meal of the day but in society it appears that it is a staple in many homes. Not mine however: )

    Embrace any human being doing the best that they can to create loving memories for their children.

    I saw a lot of rudeness going on in this feed. You might want to rethink your spanking theories: )

    It is never ok to harm your child . Yes.Humiliation of any kind is harming your child!

    You want to teach them values.Then value them!

    • Anonymous says:

      They were NOT mistreated. True it did not breed confidence but that was not the point. The point was to get it into their head that what they did was wrong and stupid. The best way to make a kid, from personal experience, remember is to put a drastic consequence for it. If the consequence does not scare them enough to not do it once then when it goes to be a public event they will. This is great parenting they make sure they dont do it again. yes it is a little drastic but those kids wont do it again and it wont be a gateway to other things like getting pregnant.

    • Nicole says:

      Interesting that those who seem to feel they turned out better than those who were punished with a belt (or, in my case, a wooden paddle with a hole in it) are the ones insulting the parenting of people they don’t even know.

      Mind your own business, perhaps? Everyone raises their children differently. I grew up the oldest daughter with three brothers. My parents did what they felt was necessary. Hell, it was just a hand swat to the butt until I was in first or second grade. The spankings stopped before I was ten. Why? Because I’d figured it out by then! Listen to your parents the first time.

      And yes, that girl may sneak out again with a guy. Humiliating her in public doesn’t ensure that she’ll never do it again. You could be one of those parents that simply removes their bedroom door when they screw up. Nothing guarantees a positive result.

      You often find that people who were spanked as children are “not fine?” Well that’s fine and dandy. I know some kids whose parents boasted at PTA meetings and soccer games that they never spanked their precious babies.

      Those precious babies grew up spoiled and feeling like they could do whatever they wanted. Their parents were essentially doormats and wallets to their kids. (Humorously, many of them comprised the “cool kids” in middle school.)

      I’m only saying, you don’t get to determine who is “fine” based on some little detail of their childhood. I can also assure you I don’t remember the spankings nearly as clearly as I remember all the good times.

      I’m more bothered by comments like yours than those that are blatantly rude. Add a smiley face on the end and it means you were only being nice and polite, right? :)

      • Dawn says:

        Just going to point out you’re making the same generalizations as the above. Not every child who wasn’t spanked was a spoiled brat; I never was, and I’ve been told I’m a polite, quiet person. My brother was slapped in the face by my dad once, because he kicked my mom in the face. He’s stubborn, and that wouldn’t change whether he was physically disciplined or not.

        My parents method of dealing with our behaviors was always along the method of explaining why something was wrong. We weren’t treated as “lesser” persons, we were never not told about things because we “were too young to understand”. Sure, we also weren’t angels, but we weren’t evil children. I went through my rebellious teen phase, which is where my brother is now.

        My mother was spanked and beaten as a child, and she has control issues and lacks healthy manners of dealing with her frustration. My dad wasn’t, and he’s the one who understands how to better burn off steam. My boyfriend’s step father was abused, and became an abuser. He tried to control the family through fear, then tried to resort to humiliation when questioned.

        Yes, I am aware that spanking is not considered abuse, but when slapping someone on the rear becomes ineffective because your kid doesn’t change their behavior anymore, where does that leave you? Do you blur the line and slap other places? Back hand them across the face, make them afraid you’ll try to beat them? Or do you try to find other methods of dealing with the issue?

        In my opinion, it’s better to find the other method so in the heat of the moment, one doesn’t try to say “well, it’s just to teach them!”

        That’s where the damage comes, I think. I would rather have the firm line, the “no hitting” down, unshakable.

        I doubt many abusers really think “I am going to hurt my child”. They think “It’s for you’re own good”, “I’m helping”, “you just need to stop”.

        Again, only my opinions, backed up by what I’ve seen. I’m sure there are parents who never crossed that line, who’s kids grew up fine. But I’ve seen a lot of cases where that has also gone wrong.

    • Anonymous says:

      Tonya— Your kids (if you even have any) most likely hate you.

  11. Skaii says:

    Okay all you softies that are saying the two with the sign are abuse need to shut up.

    It’s better to humiliate them now than to have then get pregnant or hurt by being drunk later.

    The one about sneaking boys into her room is unacceptable. Sure you can teach her about safe sex and I highly recommend it, but She could have gotten into serious trouble if she continued it but, I bet you she won’t do it any more. She could have gotten raped, killed or anything else.

    The one about the girl holding beer in front of the camera is also unacceptable. She could have and probably did, sent out the wrong message to other’s. She could have gotten drunk (if she was drinking it) and gotten seriously hurt, raped or other.

    All in all they won’t be doing something stupid like that again, so all those who are saying this is abuse need to sit down and shut up. Abuse would be beating, starving, or another other form of extreme physical and mental abuse. This is humiliation and without it they would have kept doing what they were doing. Getting grounded or scolded wouldn’t have straightened them out.

    Oh yeah and I’m 18 and I would do the same thing to my kids. My parents publicly humiliated me when I was younger and I didn’t dare do it again.

    • The One Guy Who Did That One Thing That One Time says:

      Same with me. I’m 23 now and when i did something that stupid they would humiliate me. Never made the same mistake twice.

    • childshrink says:

      The point of parenting is not to humiliate your child into temporarily doing the right thing. The point is actually the exact opposite of that. You’re supposed to help them grow up to be responsible adults who are steadfast and kind and honest no matter what anyone else thinks or does. Using peer pressure as a negative enforcement sends the message that peer pressure is valid which is extremely dangerous. Not to mention that they would (rightfully and understandably) resent the hell out of you for doing it which could lead to way worse problems down the road if left to fester. The takeaway of any punishment should be the child learning why what they did was wrong, why it should never happen again and that, in the future, they should do what is right for no other reason than because it is right not because if they don’t mom and dad will totally embarrass them in front of their friends. That’s what people are objecting to. It’s a band aid rather than a permanent fix. Regardless of whether or not you or anyone else raised similarly ultimately turned out to be a good person with a strong moral compass, I guarantee you public shaming was not why it happened.

      • Skaii says:

        I appreciate you responding in a mature way. It’s not really peer pressure, peer pressure comes from school and even though you may get pressured at home to do certain things, it’s not the same as peer pressure.

        Trust me, I don’t resent my parents for anything, as a matter of fact when I graduated this year, I personally thanked them for leading me down the right path. I’ve seen tons of kids get grounded or get something taken away and you know what happened? They did the same exact thing again and again. In the end the sad truth is that, getting something taken away that you know you’ll get back eventually isn’t a good teacher but, embarrassing them in front of their friends (who could hold it above their head for a long time) will linger with them for a long time. Talks are nice but, do you honestly think “You could have gotten hurt!” Or “You will never do that again understand? Oh, and no internet for 2 months.” Would have worked better than what you see above?

        I’d rather parents humiliate them a bit rather than hit them.

        Humiliation after all if a very admirable virtue. It takes a lot of strength to admit you were wrong to something.

        All in all, those two girls will remember those incidents and I bet you they won’t do it again.

  12. Madkazer says:

    Does it bother anyone else that most of the parents listed are guys, and the guys are doing things that mothers do all the time? So now it’s special to do things with your kid because you are a man, no one even looks when it’s a woman.

    • Lisa says:

      No, this is a moment of the pendulum swinging the other direction. In a society where adult men are projected to be either “dead beat dads” or the detached “father figure” focusing only on “boys” to do “grown man stuff”. It’s nice to see men doing kid stuff with both boys and girls. I’m more bothered that advertising and media don’t focus on fathers having fun with their kids. I am not bothered by the lack of mom pictures because moms are already depicted as good parents and it’s a fun post that doesn’t need another gender equality debate because it’s already addressing a social issue. Get over it or make your own post.

  13. Anonymous says:

    as far as the public humiliation… JUST NO. I am SO angry at any parents who would do that for ANY reason. I’m 24 but I well remember being 14/15… at that age that sort of public shaming would have made me CUT, or do something else self-destructive, possibly even worse. do any of you standing up for these “parents” actually remember being a teenager? do you remember how painful it can be and the feelings of powerlessness associated with it? I feel so bad for that girl being forced to hold the sign. if ever I saw something like this I would literally get out of my car and confront her parents, then offer her a hug and call the police. her “parents” are disgusting excuses for human beings. even if she acted out and made a really poor decision, that’s what GROUNDING is for. or take away her internet/cell phone privileges, or what ever… there are plenty of ways to discipline teenagers that are not psychologically traumatic and humiliating. this sort of thing is only going to destroy any relationship she could’ve had with her parents later in life.

    • Adam says:

      Don’t you think you’re overreacting just a little bit? What, a little embarrassment is going to make you cut yourself? If so then you already have issues that you need to deal with. You have to realize not every issue works for every situation. Sure, you could ground her and take away her things, but then what happens when she gets them back? She goes right back to doing it again, only being sneakier about it, knowing if she gets caught again, all that will happen is some of her things will be taken away only to be given right back later. What happens if she does it WHILE grounded? Then what? Ground her even more? She obviously doesn’t care. Then when she gets out into the real world, she’ll think “Oh, I can do anything I want now because my parents can’t ground me!” A lot of teens like this can be really stubborn and refuse to accept what they did was wrong, especially when given a temporary punishment. This, while it may be somewhat cruel, will probably scare her into not doing it again. Why? It affects her pride. It gives her a good dose of humility. Showing her something is wrong in a way she will understand as a teenager, maybe even the only way they might have been able to get through to her. It would be even worse if some random guy just came out and hugged her, scolded her parents and made a big fuss, showing her that it wasn’t right to be punished at all. It sends the wrong message that what she did was okay. Who knows how many times this has happened. It might have been the only way to get through to her, giving her a lasting impression that doesn’t seem like this temporary inconvenience.

      Granted, if this is showing to have severe affects on the child, then it’s time to stop. But teens are not these beings made of glass. They aren’t all the same. While this form of punishment may not be the right way to go for some, it can help an awful lot for many others. As comments posted before said, some people who were punished this way ended up just fine, so we know it’s not going to be the end of the world for all of them. Just stop if your child is showing this is affecting them in a bad way. Then they might have really bad social disorders or complexes. But as long as it’s not affecting your kid too badly, then it should be just fine in my opinion.

  14. Anonymous says:

    I know there are people disagree on some of the posts here but I think we all agree that the last Dad who caught the cace was pretty badass.

    • Bored at 1am Anonymous says:

      THANK YOU. All these back and forth about the rights and wrongs and NO ONE even applauds the father for saving that cake!

  15. Anon Y. Mous says:

    Ah, love the Cyberman dad. Best. Parent. Ever. I think.

  16. Lovely says:

    People need to calm down. There’s a difference between abuse and discipline. There’s a difference between burning your child with an iron and spanking a child. When I decide to have children , I definitely will spank my child. I see nothing wrong with it. No one can tell you how to discipline your own child, if according to CPS, there’s no abuse.
    I think that the girl holding the sign will rethink her choices. I’m sure that’s not the first time she snuck boys in. What suggestion do you guys have for her parents? I’m sure they’ve tried talking to her. Most of the people here have all these things to say about how wrong and awful the sign is. Apparently there are some perfect parents here. How should her parents deal?

  17. catlover1019 says:

    Shaming is not good parenting.

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