25 Places Corgis Don’t Belong

Corgis can be a little mischievous. Let’s take a look at a few corgis who have found themselves in places they simply don’t belong…

Hovering in mid-air:

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Under these pillows:

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Lined up on this bench:

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In The Avengers:

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In this swing:

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Under this coffee table:

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On top of this dog:

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Inside this beer box:

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Leading these ducks:

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Stuck in an ice cream carton:

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Buried in the sand:

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On Spike Spiegel’s head:

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In your graduating class:

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Sandwiched in a couch:

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Babysitting this horse:

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Hiding in a slipper:

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Abraham Lincoln’s lap:

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On your computer:

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Stuck in this snow embankment:

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Driving this car:

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On this windowsill: 

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Staring down a lobster:

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In your mixer:

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On this pool floatie:

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Chillaxin’ on a rainbow:

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8 responses to 25 Places Corgis Don’t Belong

  1. The one stuck in the snow embankment isn’t a corgi from what I can tell. Still a great post nonetheless, very, very cute.

        1. Definitely not a chow, for several reasons.
          1. Wrong facial structure.
          2. That’s not a registerable color for chows. (They fall on the black OR red spectrum; Black with red points is not a valid registry color or pattern for the breed.)

          It appears to be a lesser-common corgi variety, generally refered to as the “fluffy” corgi. Fluffy corgi is the commonly-used term for the longhair corgi variety, as opposed to the standard shorthair variety.

          Additionally, the floppy ear gene exists in corgis, but is relatively rare and breeding of it is discouraged. It is in all likelihood, a purebred Pem or Cardi Fluffy Corgi, with a ear gene that produces shorter ears.

          Sources: Varied. Also, I research dogs as a hobby.

        2. Another breed it *might* be is a Shikoku. However, this pattern does not seem to be present within Shikokus. The facial structure does line up with Shikokus, though.

          Possibly a Shikoku-Corgi cross. Rather unusual.

  2. The horse one is actually not supposed to be here. Corgis were bred as herding dogs. They are short so that when cows kick at the dog as they nip the legs (to move the animals), the hooves go over the head rather than hit and injure the dogs.

    Corgis are great with livestock of any sort, particularly bigger animals, and don’t have an inbred fear of such animals.

    So no, seeing a horse with a corgi is not anything unusual. It is, in fact, precisely what the breed was designed for!

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